Course Syllabi for First Semester 2017-2018

Below are the links to my course syllabi.

Political Science 11: Introduction to Political Science

Political Science 111: Qualitative Research Methods in Political Science

Political Science 126: Philippine Political Thought

Electronic books on Federalism

Since federalism is a hot topic right now, it is best that we read up on what it is about as well as the experiences of other countries. Here are some electronic books (pdf) on federalism.

I will add some more soon. Enjoy reading!

POLSC 160, 161, 196: Course Requirements

POLSC 160

Long Essay Examinations (60 points per exam). There will be two long essay examinations. The first long examination covers the first half of the course. The second examination covers the second half of the course. Both exams require essay responses. Generally, students should only follow a simple instruction: answer the questions in a direct, concise, and comprehensive manner. No make-up exams will be given to those who miss any of the exams unless the student has a valid excuse, i.e. illness, and an official excuse slip.

Term Paper (60 points). Each student will write a 15-page term paper (approximately 4000 words) addressing various issues concerning state, society and/or state-society dynamics. Students may focus on the Philippine case or do a comparative analysis.

Topics may revolve around any of the following:

  • Problematization of power;
  • Political culture;
  • Social and political capital;
  • Media and politics;
  • Politics of identity;
  • Party politics;
  • Interest groups and movement politics;
  • Participation in politics; and
  • Democratization, development, and globalization.

Students are advised to submit a topic prospectus containing the question or issue to be addressed, as well as a working bibliography with annotations of not less than five materials, on or before September 9 (Friday). Students are also expected to consult with the instructor in the process of their research to make sure that their outputs are satisfactory. The final paper shall be submitted one week after the last day of classes, December 12 (Monday). The instructor will provide specific details in class. Late submissions will not be accepted and will receive zero points.

Seminar Presentation (60 points). Students will be grouped and assigned a specific topic to present in class. Students should remember that this is NOT reporting, but a seminar. This means that aside from the definitions and enumerations (which are actually highly discouraged), students are expected to discuss the topics by looking at the (1) competing conceptualizations and theorizations of scholars, (2) recurring and emerging issues and concerns, and (3) specific country cases and examples. In addition to the actual presentation in class, students are required to produce a handout of not more than four pages, containing the topic outline, notes, and guide questions for class discussion. These should be submitted ONE week before the schedule of presentation.

Individual Participation in Class (60 points). Each student is expected to actively participate in class activities and discussions. In order to ensure smooth and interesting discussion, students should read the assigned materials. Aside from the guide questions, questions from the class are expected in order to initiate discussions. If you can ask questions, you can think. Mere recitation does not guarantee points. As university students, you are expected to answer with substance and sense.


POLSC 161

Long Essay Examinations (60 points per exam). There will be two long essay examinations. The first long examination covers the first half of the course. The second examination covers the second half of the course. Both exams require essay responses. Generally, students should only follow a simple instruction: answer the questions in a direct, concise, and comprehensive manner. No make-up exams will be given to those who miss any of the exams unless the student has a valid excuse, i.e. illness, and an official excuse slip.

Term Paper (60 points). Each student will write a 15-page term paper (approximately 4000 words) addressing various issues on political parties and interest groups. Students may focus on the Philippine case or do a comparative analysis.

Topics for Political Parties may revolve around the following:

  • Party as organization: ideology, level of institutionalization, type, membership, and resources;
  • Party in government: goals, strategies and tactics in directing government; and
  • Party outside government or party-in-the-electorate: public reputation, electoral campaign strategies, and tactics.

For Interest Groups, students may focus on either general or a specific interest group, around the following areas:

  • Goals, functions, organizational attributes, and resources of interest groups;
  • Strategies and tactics employed by interest groups; and
  • Impact of interest groups on public policy.

Students are advised to submit a topic prospectus containing the question or issue to be addressed, as well as a working bibliography with annotations of not less than five materials, on or before September 9 (Friday). Students are also expected to consult with the instructor in the process of their research to make sure that their outputs are satisfactory. The final paper shall be submitted one week after the last day of classes, December 12 (Monday). The instructor will provide specific details in class. Late submissions will not be accepted and will receive zero points.

Seminar Presentation (60 points). Students will be grouped and assigned a specific topic to present in class. Students should remember that this is NOT reporting, but a seminar. This means that aside from the definitions and enumerations (which are actually highly discouraged), students are expected to discuss the topics by looking at the (1) competing conceptualizations and theorizations of scholars, (2) recurring and emerging issues and concerns, and (3) specific country cases and examples. In addition to the actual presentation in class, students are required to produce a handout of not more than four pages, containing the topic outline, notes, and guide questions for class discussion. These should be submitted ONE week before the schedule of presentation.

Individual Participation in Class (60 points). Each student is expected to actively participate in class activities and discussions. In order to ensure smooth and interesting discussion, students should read the assigned materials. Aside from the guide questions, questions from the class are expected in order to initiate discussions. If you can ask questions, you can think. Mere recitation does not guarantee points. As university students, you are expected to answer with substance and sense.


POLSC 196

Long Essay Examinations (60 points per exam). There will be two long essay examinations. The first long examination covers the first half of the course. The second examination covers the second half of the course. Both exams require essay responses. Generally, students should only follow a simple instruction: answer the questions in a direct, concise, and comprehensive manner. No make-up exams will be given to those who miss any of the exams unless the student has a valid excuse, i.e. illness, and an official excuse slip.

Essay (60 points). Each student will write an essay (approximately 2500-3000 words) addressing a chosen issue on Philippine political thought. Students are advised to submit a topic prospectus containing the question or issue to be addressed, as well as a working bibliography with annotations of not less than five materials, on or before September 9 (Friday). Students are also expected to consult with the instructor in the process of writing their essays to make sure that their outputs are satisfactory. The essay shall be submitted one week after the last day of classes, December 12 (Monday). The instructor will provide specific details in class. Late submissions will not be accepted and will receive zero points.

Seminar Presentation (60 points). Students will be grouped and assigned a political thinker to present in class. Students should remember that this is NOT reporting, but a seminar. This means that aside from the brief biographical notes and information, students are expected to discuss the political ideas of each thinker by looking at the (1) issues and concerns the thinkers tried to address in their respective works, (2) distinct political ideas proposed or contributions to political thinking, and (3) an analysis. In addition to the actual presentation in class, students are required to produce a handout of not more than four pages, containing the topic outline, notes, and guide questions for class discussion. These should be submitted ONE week before the schedule of presentation.

Creative Project (60 points). Since Political Science 196 is seldom offered by the Department, very few are aware of the course and its content. In order to spread awareness, the class may opt to form two to three groups, or the entire class as one group, to satisfy this requirement. The projects can be any of, but not limited to, the following: exhibit, posters, forum, and blogs. Other details of this requirement will be explained in class.

Individual Participation in Class (60 points). Each student is expected to actively participate in class activities and discussions. In order to ensure smooth and interesting discussion, students should read the assigned materials. Aside from the guide questions, questions from the class are expected in order to initiate discussions. If you can ask questions, you can think. Mere recitation does not guarantee points. As university students, you are expected to answer with substance and sense.

POLSC 167: Schedule of Presentation

PERCEPTIONS (December 3, 10-11:30am, DPS 326)
Perception of Student Athletes on Tertiary Quality Education
Baguisa, Michael Rommel Iglesias

Perception of Public High School Students on Tertiary Education in the Philippines
Monsod, Patricia Angela Dizon

Do they meet halfway?: A Case Study on the Perceptions of Teachers and Students on the Purpose of Secondary Education
Besa, Leoniliane Diones

Generating Proficiency and Development: Innovation for Education, Education for Evolution
Mendoza, Mara Cesario

CASE STUDIES (December 3, 1-2:30pm, DPS 326)
Globalization and the Education System: A Case Study on Indigenous Peoples Schools in Oriental Mindoro
Chavez, Mareane Mabel Abas

Guarding the Right to Education: Measuring the Accessibility of Education in Bacoor, Cavite
Villanueva, Lyza Denise Guisando

Perceptions toward Compulsory Education: Case Study on Mandaluyong City
Ubante, John Nicanor Arce

Barriers to Learning of UP-Diliman students from Mindanao
Saligumba, Sharmaine Virtudazo

POLITICAL VALUES (December 3, 2:30-4pm, DPS 326)
Political Correctness Gone Mad: Shaping Values and Beliefs in the Education System
Nazario, Renz Christian David

Teaching Nationalism: Keeping the Nation Together through Education
Calub, Lance Jestin Reyes

Missing Values: Examination of Democratic Values in Public Education Curriculum in the Philippines
Alvior, John Rey Castaneda

Nation-Building through Education under the Philippine 1987 Constitution
Velasco, Franz Raphael Mendoza

EDUCATION FINANCING POLICY (December 3, 4-5:30am, DPS 326)
Is It About The Money?: Education Finance and The Quality of Education
Mendoza, Maria Elize Hao

Finding the Right Balance between Need and Merit: The Search for an Efficient and Equitable Student Aid in the Philippines
Esteban, Razel Ann Pelandas

The Causal Relationship Between The Current Education Policies and the Broadening Income Disparity in the Philippines
Navarro, Bea Czarina Buenaventura

Tertiary Education Funding and the Case of “Privatizing” State Universities and Colleges
De Leon, Bea Xandra Magpoc

K TO 12 (December 4, 1-2:30pm, DPS 326)
Dimensions of Dissent: A Discourse Analysis of Political Claims in K+12 Related Social Mobilizations
Baquisal, Justin Keith Achas

Adaptability to Educational Reform: Assessment on K12 readiness of Public schools in Mandaluyong City
Caballes, Leo Cezar Garcia

Perceptions of Grade 10 Students on the Senior High School (SHS) feature of the K-12 Program: A Case of a Rural Municipality
Cerera, Florence Diane Nunez

PURPOSE OF EDUCATION (December 4, 10-11:30am, DPS 326)
Ideo-cation: Higher Education under the Latin American Pink Tide
Galunan, Christine Joy Llagas

Made in the Philippines: A Qualitative Analysis on Education Policies and How It Shapes a Neo-Colonialist Philippine Society
Santiago, Carlo Enrico Palacios

A Pursuit to What End?: Reassessing the Purpose of Education Amid the Right Versus Privilege Debate
Fajardo, Pauline Faye Sarmiento

Left Out: Why Education Should Be A Right
Gallardo, Reiner

ISSUES (December 4, 2:30-4pm, DPS 326)
Teaching the Story of the Birds and the Bees: Determining Attitudes Formed, and Evaluation of Sex Education in UPIS
Reyes, Nigel Lorenzo Valencerina

Social Inclusion or Quality Education: A Closer Look at the Struggles of the LGBT Youth in Secondary Schools
Guinto, Maria Carissa Cadenas

Mother Tongue 101: A Study on the Impact of Local Languages to Learning
Velayo, Kyrsten Valerie Reyes

Pass the Message: A Study on the Role of Inter-Governmental Communication and Responsiveness of Public Schools to Education Policy
Reyes, Rocco Alejandro Dizon

SPED AND JUVENILE (December 4, 4-5:30am, DPS 326)
Addressing Special Needs: How Local Government Units Run SPED Centers
Umali, Margaret Antoniella Natividad

Count the Exceptional: A Comparative Analysis of the Special Education System in Public and Private Schools in Quezon City
Ilacad, Stephanie Nicole Macabagdal

SPEND for SpEd: A Closer Look on the Funding of the SpEd Sector
Gavieres, Trisha Anne De Guzman

Sentenced to Education: Analyzing How Juvenile Justice is Served at Tanglaw Pag-Asa Center for Youth Offenders
De Guzman, Vivien Rose Carlos